About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN 2
FBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
CNNW 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
and i can remember it is in the urban environment where a terrorist is loose with the potential device that is a suicide best if got into a large area he could kill a lot of people so they went to quarantine block by block why there's so many people present there is a blood flow he is lending and people would realize who he was a piece surfaced on the streets so they know that is why it is quarantined. >> these do terrorist remained in close proximity year this scene of their crime,,the scene of the bombings and i think authorities made some pretty good judgments as to whether or not he was much beyond that and a recent successfully he did not it is an impressive display to this point* to managed to contain these to a terrorist as we talk about their lack of training and resources creating a calamitous results. we are getting word now from local media that a neighbor on franklin street has seen police check about that was in her yard -- a boat and we're getting this from local media channels since there was something different about the vote or whatever cover was on its a and called po
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
environment, but aided dramatically by all the video that has been made available. >> i think that's right. i think this is going to raise a debate long term in america like the debates we had on gun control in the wake of events that were so tragic in the past year or so. people are initially going to say, hey, look at the advantage you get in this 21st century environment where you have surveillance cameras everywhere. an environment that the europeans, by the way, are way ahead of us on. a lot more surveillance in europe than there is here. i suspect over the course of a month or two or three months americans will step back and say, hey, that might have aided that investigation but we're not sure we want to live in that kind of security culture. >> and we can't draw, phil, any hard conclusions about one of these bombs was in a pressure cooker. that's obviously available very easily. you can't draw any conclusions whether that's a signature of a domestic or a foreign terrorist. >> actually, i would draw conclusions. but more about what it's not than what it is. when you look at the people i
are a vulnerable group. >> generally speaking you need the environment in which they were flourish and which they can work together. you need the context. >> rose: if they are good -- >> it will happen with the actor speaking the text and somebody listening. you don't need the director for that you need somebody to organize it all. >> rose: how much do you want to act? >> you know, i always juggled both. and i read -- as i joined strad for as an actor i read a piece of fla ubert that said most people in life end up what they do second best. >> rose: by dereking you are doing what you do second best? >> no first best. >> rose: as a actor you were seco best? >> other people could my the parts i was playing. i suppose i could see. i like to stand back and see the whole -- >> rose: it's an interesting idea because you think about shaping other things. the idea is how do you make a decision as to what it is you do best, not second best? and how do you drill down on that so you are truly being creative and bringing something that no one else has? i'm sure people are smart at self evaluation and th
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the raleally remarkable story is so many ha
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
them into an environment that is hostile to gays and lesbians -- >> stephanie: yeah. that's true. you are teaching them, like it's okay if this is a phase and then just work your way out of it by the time you were 18. >> yeah, and if you don't then we don't want you. but while you are here maybe let's do some back door repair with therapy. >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: we have people who are totally anti-gay with their arms wrapped around people who need to see the light and be morally straight. >> yeah. ann romney will show up saying stop it. >> ann romney: stop it. this is hard. you want to try it get in the ring. stop it. >> stephanie: are you pitching a tent. top it. merny you are on the "stephanie miller show." >> caller: good morning, stephanie. hang on just a minute -- i got to -- >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: i just wanted to remind everybody that pedophilia is not about the sex, it's a form of rape basically -- it's about domination power, control, the whole bit, and i think these people are just a little bit afraid to seay adults, heaven forbid h
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)